ByzantineEmpires.org
History of Byzantine Eastern Roman Empire for Kids

Byzantine Empire History  
     
 
         
 
Home Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Timeline
Byzantine Empire Decline
12 Byzantine Rulers
Traditions and Customs
Byzantine Contributions
Double Headed Eagle
Byzantine Emperors
Empire Army
Byzantine Artifacts
Empire Artists
Buildings Architecture
Byzantine Calendar
Empire Capital
Byzantine Cavalry
Byzantine Christianity
Byzantine Coinage
Daily Life of People
Divine Liturgy
Byzantine Dynasties
Byzantine Economy
Geography
Gold Coins
Historians
Empire Hymns
Byzantine Iconoclasm
Empire Icons
Ivory Artifacts
Jerusalem
Byzantine Jewellery
Justinian Emperor
Byzantine Language
Empire Laws
Empire Lyrics
Monastery
Mosaics
Empire Names
Empire Navy
Paintings
Empire People
Prayers
Sources Of Information
Princess
Provincial Governors
Empire Quotes
Empire Rings
Rite Catholic
Sculptures
Empire Ships
Social Structure
Symbol
Technology
Empire Trade
Empire Wars
Privacy Policy
 

Byzantine Emperors History

It is not possible to effectually distinguish between the later empire in Rome and the Byzantine empire centered around Constantinople. For the Byzantines was the Roman Empire, not simply a continuation of it in the East. The capital city, Constantinople, had been founded as the capital of Rome by the Emperor Constantine, but a uniquely Greek or Byzantine character to the Roman Empire can be distinguished as early as Diocletian.

The first Byzantine emperor to lose the throne by violent revolution was Mavrikios (Maurice) Tiberius (586-602). He probably ranked in competence with the best, but his strict economizing cost him the crown and his life. He refused to allow troops stationed at the frontier to return home for the winter. Moreover, he insisted they live off the land rather than be sent winter rations..

The reign of Basil II was widely acknowledged to be one of the outstanding Byzantine emperors. Basil was the son of Romanus II and Theophano and was crowned co-emperor with his brother Constantine in 960. After their fatherís death in 963, the government was effectively undertaken by the senior military emperors, first by Nicephorus II Phocas, their stepfather, and then by John I Tzimisces.

On the latterís death (976) the powerful great-uncle of Basil II, the eunuch Basil the chamberlain, took control. Justinian I for example was a brutal king but left his mark on the empire as a master-builder building the largest and finest churches that would not be equalled until the great cathedrals of Italy a thousand years later.

Emperors kept alive the empire that ruled the Europe, Asia Minor, The Mediterranean, Palestine, and, North Africa and transitioned the ancient eras through the medieval period into the modern era.

Along the way it cradled Christianity and protected the rights of other cultures while handing over the classical legacies of these emperors kept alive the empire that ruled the Europe, Asia Minor, The Mediterranean, Palestine, and, North Africa and transitioned the ancient eras through the medieval period into the modern era.

Along the way it cradled Christianity and protected the rights of other cultures while handing over the classical legacies of Greece and Rome to the renaissance emperors kept alive the empire that ruled the Europe, Asia Minor, The Mediterranean, Palestine, and, North Africa and transitioned the ancient eras through the medieval period into the modern era. Along the way it cradled Christianity and protected the rights of other cultures while handing over the classical legacies of Greece and Rome to the renaissance.


This site gives you complete information on the Byzantine Empire.

Ottoman & Byzantine Compare Byzantine Vs Roman Catholics Empire Rule
Ancient Byzantine Saints Arab Wars Architecture
Bureaucracy Empire Art Churches
Painters Empire Walls Vestments
Seminary Diplomacy Decoration
Crosses Basilica and Cathedrals Government
Necklace Jewelry Notation Swords
Emperor Leo iii Emperor Heraclius Rule Constantinople History

   
  Contact: ace_offers at yahoo.co.uk :